William to take ‘reactionary and agile’ approach when he is King after eye-opening tour

William to take ‘reactionary and agile’ approach when he is King after eye-opening tour

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Prince William ‘will navigate people once King’ says expert

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The analysis came after the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge completed their eye-opening royal tour in the Caribbean which saw the couple overcome several protests and shock announcements regarding the future of the Commonwealth. According to several insiders, the 40-year-old royal member faces real difficulties if he wants to reinvent the monarchy when he becomes King.

William has said he wants to break tradition, and according to experts, his rule will take a “reactionary and agile” approach which would aim to ditch the “never complain, never explain” policy adopted by previous monarchs.

An insider told the Daily Mail: “He definitely won’t be speaking out regularly but believes if the monarchy has something to say, then it should say it.

“He’s not being critical of the Queen, far from it. He admires her absolutely and has learnt so much from her.

“But he is looking ahead to how things will be in 40 years’ time.

Prince William

William to take ‘reactionary and agile’ approach when he is King after eye-opening tour (Image: Getty Images)

William and Kate

William to take ‘reactionary and agile’ approach when he is King after eye-opening tour (Image: Getty Images)

“He wants the monarchy to continue to be a unifying force, to bridge the gap.”

After the tour, William issued a statement before boarding a plane back to the UK saying the visit “had brought into even sharper focus questions about the past and future”, although it is believed that this was not discussed with the Queen and Prince Charles in advance.

He said: “In Belize, Jamaica and the Bahamas, that future is for the people to decide upon. Catherine and I are committed to service.

“It’s not about telling people what to do. Who the Commonwealth chooses to lead its family in the future isn’t what is on my mind.

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Prince william

The 40-year-old royal member faces real difficulties if he wants to reinvent the monarchy (Image: Getty Images)

“What matters to us is the potential the Commonwealth family has to create a better future for the people who form it, and our commitment to serve and support as best we can.”

One former palace public relations source told the publication that this was unsurprising as William was more flexible over his future role as King than many understood.

The source said: “There’s a feeling in the institution that over time the monarchy can update itself and change, but it has to be gradual, subtle and carefully thought through.”

Philip Murphy, a professor at the University of London and former director of the Institute of Commonwealth Studies, told The Guardian that William’s comments reflect how the palace is “involved in a constant learning process” that balances tradition with public opinion.

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Prince William

William has said he wants to break tradition (Image: Getty Images)

William

After the tour, William issued a statement before boarding a plane back to the UK (Image: Getty Images)

He said: “Sometimes it has to ditch the standard way of doing things and reinvent the process, and that’s what we’re seeing here.”

Mr Murphy thought the problems in the Caribbean had likely arisen because the region was a “constitutional grey zone”.

However, he suggested that William could have been “more flexible and imaginative” in Jamaica.

He said: “I think the British government, in particular, have got to rethink the whole nature of royal tours.

“They create a disconnect between some of the coverage in the rightwing tabloids in Britain and the way these issues are covered and commented on in the international media and in Commonwealth countries themselves.”

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