Horror as  charging bison gores man, 34, as he snatched a boy from attack in Yellowstone Park

Horror as charging bison gores man, 34, as he snatched a boy from attack in Yellowstone Park

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Dramatic video shows the moment a 1,800lb charging bison gored a 34-year-old man as he heroically rescued a little boy who was in the beast’s path in Yellowstone National Park. 

The man, from Colorado Springs, was in the national park when he attacked by the male bison after he quickly snatched the child away from the charging animal on Monday.

Park rangers warned that visitors should keep 75ft (25 yards) away from the creatures because they are ‘wild animals’ that feel ‘threatened’ if they are approached. 

Video shows two adults walking towards the bison with the little boy on a path in the national park when the animal charged at them. 

At the same time, the 34-year-old man, who was walking ahead of his family, is seen running towards the other two adults and the boy, as dust is lifted into the air from the charging bison. 

The bison is seen charging at the boy, who tries to run away, before the heroic man lifted the child into the air and pushed him out of the way as his relatives watched in horror. 

But the bison latched onto the man’s arm during the attack and lifted him into the air before he was able to escape and run away.

Video shows two adults walking towards the bison with the little boy on a path in the national park when the animal charged at them

At the same time, the 34-year-old man, who was walking ahead of his family, is seen running towards the other two adults and the boy, as dust is lifted into the air from the charging bison

The bison is seen charging at the boy, who tries to run away, before the heroic man lifted the child into the air and pushed him out of the way as his relatives watched in horror

The bison latched onto the man’s arm during the attack and lifted him into the air before he was able to escape and run away. 

The man sustained an injury to his arm following the incident and was taken to the Eastern Idaho Regional Medical Center in an ambulance.

The National Park Service said in a statement: ‘The male was walking with his family on a boardwalk when a bull bison charged the group.

‘Family members did not leave the area, and the bull bison continued to charge and gored the male.’

Rob Goodell, who filmed the attack, told the Cowboy State Daily: ‘The dad and the kid were just walking up to the bison when the bison took off. 

‘Anyone who says that the bison just attacked that guy or whatever, that’s bullst. The bison was just protecting his ground.’ 

But the bison latched onto the man’s arm during the attack and lifted him into the air before he was able to escape and run away with the boy 

The man sustained an injury to his arm following the incident and was taken to the Eastern Idaho Regional Medical Center in an ambulance. Pictured: The bison walked away after attack

Goodell said he had been watching the family closely because of how close they were to the bison. He said he did not start filming until the incident escalated.

He said the video does not show that the family had time to move away from the area – but instead they stayed close to the bison. 

‘I didn’t even say anything during the entire video because I just assumed that guy was going to get murdered,’ Goodell said. ‘It was like holy c, this is crazy.’

Bison, which can weigh more than 2,000lb, are six feet tall and can run three times faster than humans. 

A bison walks past people who just watched the eruption of Old Faithful Geyser in Yellowstone National Park on June 22

Park rangers warned: ‘Wildlife in Yellowstone National Park are wild and can be dangerous when approached.

‘When an animal is near a campsite, trail, boardwalk, parking lot, or in a developed area, give it space. 

‘Stay more than 25 yards (23 m) away from all large animals – bison, elk, bighorn sheep, deer, moose, and coyotes – and at least 100 yards (91 m) away from bears and wolves. 

‘If need be, turn around and go the other way to avoid interacting with a wild animal in proximity.’

The attack comes just weeks after a bison gored and killed a 25-year-old woman in Yellowstone National Park after she approached the animal despite explicit warning signs in the area instructing visitors to stay at least 25-yards away from dangerous wildlife. 

The bison was walking near a boardwalk at Black Sand Basin, just north of Old Faithful, when the out-of-state visitor approached it in May. 

She got within 10-feet (three meters) before the animal impaled her with its horn and tossed her 10 feet into the air.

The woman later died according to the park officials. The woman from Grove City, Ohio, sustained a puncture wound and other injuries.

 A bison gored and killed a 25-year-old woman in Yellowstone National Park in May

The bison was walking near a boardwalk (above) at Black Sand Basin, just north of Old Faithful, when the out-of-state visitor approached it, according to a park statement.

Bison often behave much like cattle, lumbering about and lazing in the sunshine. But when they get a mind to, they can run up to 40mph. (Above) American Bison (also known as Buffalo) pass by tourists at Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming on June 1, 2011

In 2020, a 72-year-old camper was gored and flung 15ft in the air by a bison after she advanced to within 10ft of the animal. 

Footage of the encounter in Yellowstone National Park was taken by another family at the campsite, who watched in horror as the creature attacked the woman who was trying to take a photo. 

The California woman was left unconscious on the grass and was subsequently airlifted to hospital, but the bison did not damage any major organs. 

Risky move: A woman advances to within 10ft of a bison – well short of the recommended 75ft – in an encounter which ended with her being gored and flung into the air 

In May 2020, a woman was knocked to the ground when she got too close to a bison near the popular Old Faithful geyser after the park partially re-opened.

In 2019, a nine-year-old girl visiting Yellowstone National Park has been struck and thrown into the air by a charging bison.

The girl, from Odessa, Florida, was in a group of roughly 50 people who were standing near the bison for about 20 minutes in the Old Faithful Geyser area before it charged, Yellowstone officials said. 

The girl, from Odessa, Florida, was in a group of roughly 50 people who were standing near the bison for about 20 minutes in the Old Faithful Geyser area on Monday before it charged

Wild video shows the large beast grazing before it charges at the girl and two adults who managed to flee the area

Dramatic video shows the large beast grazing before it begins pacing toward the girl and two adults.  

The two adults notice the beast and dart off, leaving the girl behind as she tries to run away from the commotion. 

The bison hits her and she goes flying in the air, as bystanders watch in horror. 

The victim, who has not been identified, was taken to the Old Faithful Lodge by her family and she was treated by emergency personnel. She has since been released from the Old Faithful Clinic.

The bison charges after the small girl and flings her into the air, to the shock and horror of bystanders

The victim, who was not identified, was taken to the Old Faithful Lodge by her family and she was treated by emergency personnel. She has since been released from the Old Faithful Clinic

In 2018, another California woman – 59-year-old Kim Hancock – was taken to a hospital with a hip injury after being gored by another bison.

In 2015, two people including a 62-year-old Australian were gored within three weeks.

The other victim was a 16-year-old girl from Taiwan who was hospitalized after being attacked as she posed for a picture near the animal.

Millions of visitors travel yearly to Yellowstone, which spans parts of Wyoming, Montana and Idaho, to view wildlife, including its famed bison, also known as buffalo.

Park rules dictate that visitors give animals a wide berth, requiring them to stay at least 25 yards from bison and elk and 100 yards from predators such as wolves and bears.

Tragic Accidents in Yellowstone

Bison attack and injure visitors at Yellowstone National Park more than other animal. According to a 2018 study, photography was the most common reason for bison charging at people between 2000 and 2015.

However, visitors at the park have suffered injuries, and also encountered death in other incidents, including: falling into geysers and being attacked by bears.

Wildlife in Yellowstone National Park are wild and can be dangerous when approached. When an animal is near a campsite, trail, boardwalk, parking lot, or in a developed area, it is advised to give it space and to stay at least 25 yards (23 meters) away from the animals.

Visitors are also warned of staying away from hot springs, with at least 22 people having died from related incidents in and around Yellowstone since 180, according to the park. 

1. MAN FALLS INTO HOT SPRING  

Colin Scott, 23, and of Portand, Oregon, had been looking for a place to ‘hot pot’ – a term for soaking in the park’s natural thermal features – in the summer of 2013. 

His sister Sable Scott said that she and her brother left the boardwalk near Pork Chop Geyser, according to a report on the incident.

While she filmed video with her phone, her brother reached down to check the water temperature but accidentally ‘slipped and fell’ into the scalding pool, she said.

Search and rescue rangers spotted his body in the pool on the day of the accident, but a lightning storm prevented their rescue efforts. By the following day, workers were unable to find any remains.

Deputies called the area where the accident happened – the Norris Geyser basin – ‘very dangerous’ with boiling acidic waters. Colin and Sable Scott left the boardwalk and walked several hundred feet up a hill.

The accident occurred in the hottest, oldest and most volatile area of Yellowstone, where boiling water flows just beneath a think rock crust.

Previous geological surveys found the water under the surface to measure more than 400 degrees. Water temperatures there can reach 199 degrees Fahrenheit – the boiling point for water at the park’s high elevation.

Scott is pictured at his recent graduation

2. ELDERLY WOMAN GORED

Another woman, from California, was repeatedly gored by a wild bison at Yellowstone National Park in 2020. 

The 72-year-old – who has not been publicly identified – was attacked at the Bridge Bay Campground campsite after she approached the wild animal to try and snap a photograph. 

The woman was immediately tended to by park rangers before she was flown  to Eastern Idaho Regional Medical Center via helicopter for further treatment. 

A press release from the National Park Service stated that the women came within 10 feet of the bison before she was gored. 

‘To be safe around bison, stay at least 25 yards away, move away if they approach, and run away or find cover if they charge,’ the park’s Senior Bison Biologist Chris Geremia is quoted as saying in an statement from back then.

3. MAN KILLED BY BEAR

A father-of-four was killed in a suspected grizzly bear attack after his remains were discovered by a search party near Yellowstone National Park in Montana in March of this year. 

The remains of Craig Clouatre, 40, of Livingston, were discovered by Park County Search and Rescue near Yellowstone National Park.

Clouatre went missing after hiking in the Six Mile Creek area of Paradise Valley, according to The Living Enterprise. The mountains in the area rise steeply above the Yellowstone River as it passes through the Paradise Valley. 

Clouatre had gone hiking with a friend but the pair split up, possibly to hunt for antlers.

Pictured: Craig Clouatre, 40, of Livingston, repo rtedly went missing after hiking in the Six Mile Creek area of Paradise Valley on Wednesday

Pictured: the location of the deadly grizzly attack that reportedly took Clouatre’s life in relation to Yellowstone National Park

Since 2010, grizzlies in the Yellowstone region have killed at least eight people.

Among them was a backcountry guide killed by a bear last year along Yellowstone’s western border. Guide Charles ‘Carl’ Mock was killed in April after being mauled by a 400-plus pound male grizzly while fishing alone at a favorite spot on Montana´s Madison River, where it spills out of the park.

Grizzlies are protected under federal law outside Alaska. Elected officials in the Yellowstone region are pushing to lift protections and allow grizzly hunting.

The Yellowstone region spanning portions of Montana, Idaho and Wyoming has more than 700 bears. 

4. WOMAN JUMPS INTO HOT SPRING TO SAVE PET

Laiha Slayton, 20, was horrifically burned after jumping into a 190-degree Yellowstone geyser to try and save her puppy – Shih Tzu – in October 2021. 

She was initially put in a medically-induced coma at an Idaho hospital right after the October 5 incident. It remains unclear if she still is, as of Wednesday.

Laiha and her father, Woodrow, briefly stopped for a visit at Yellowstone National Park and had parked 20-30 yards away from Maiden’s Grave Spring, next to the Firehole River, according to the vicitm’s sister – Kamilla.

The family’s two Shih Tzus, Rusty and Chevy, had gotten out of the car and were wandering around nearby while Slayton was looking for their leashes in the car.

Rusty suddenly got his foot burned by a small leak from the geyser that flows into the river. The dog then panicked and fell in to the spring while Woodrow was trying to gain control of Chevy.

Laiha jumped in to the thermal spring – which can reach temperatures of 190-degree Fahrenheit – in a bid to rescue her one-year-old puppy, and then had to be rescued herself by her father.

Woodrow, 48, pulled his daughter out of the scalding water after just eight seconds.

Woodrow — although injured — drove Laiha to West Yellowstone, Montana, to seek help, from where she was flown by helicopter to the burn unit at Eastern Idaho Regional Medical Center in Idaho Falls.

As a result from the fall, Laiha’s body is 90 percent covered with severe burns – half of which are third-degree, with the remainder second-degree. 

Laiha Slayton was scalded in a Yellowstone geyster in October of last year, and has suffered second and third-degree burns to 90 percent of her body 

Rusty, the Shih Tzu puppy, was taken to a veterinarian but did not survive from its wounds

Maiden’s Grave Hot Spring flowing into the Firehole River in Yellowstone National Park, where Laiha and her dog reportedly fell into and suffered burns on October 5th

The incident happened at Maiden’s Grave Spring, north of the famous Old Faithful Geyser in Yellowstone Park, Wyoming 

Laiha (pictured) was taken to hospital in Idaho by helicopter after her father drove her to West Yellowstone, Montana, to seek help

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