Historians fear smaller Coronation could ‘waste opportunity to advertise Britain on a global stage’


A ‘stripped back’ Coronation could squander a vital chance to promote Britain’s global standing, commentators said yesterday.

King Charles is said to favour a cut-down ceremony that would be drastically shorter in length and would see the guest list slashed from 8,000 dignitaries to just 2,000.

Commentators warned the plans risked sending a message around the world of a ‘cut-price Coronation’ and would waste an opportunity to show off the nation on the global stage.

Historians said it could be a lost opportunity to exert the ‘soft power’ of the monarchy, as scenes of pomp and pageantry would draw the eyes of the world to Britain.

The Queen’s state funeral drew tourists to London and Windsor and the Coronation could provide a similar boost.

Historian Andrew Roberts said the Coronation – expected next summer – could prove to be a much-needed celebration after a winter dominated by the cost of living crunch and the war in Ukraine.

King Charles (pictured reading the Queen's speed in May) is said to favour a cut-down ceremony that would be drastically shorter in length and would see the guest list slashed from 8,000 dignitaries to just 2,000

King Charles (pictured reading the Queen’s speed in May) is said to favour a cut-down ceremony that would be drastically shorter in length and would see the guest list slashed from 8,000 dignitaries to just 2,000

Royal watchers had hoped for a day of pageantry to rival the Queen's Coronation in 1953 (pictured), which was watched by millions in Britain and around the world

Royal watchers had hoped for a day of pageantry to rival the Queen’s Coronation in 1953 (pictured), which was watched by millions in Britain and around the world

The Queen's state funeral (pictured_ drew tourists to London and Windsor and the Coronation could provide a similar boost

The Queen’s state funeral (pictured_ drew tourists to London and Windsor and the Coronation could provide a similar boost

‘Peace broker’ role after Leicester unrest 

The King wants to continue his work as a ‘peace broker’, with recent tensions in Leicester top of his agenda. 

As Prince of Wales, Charles devoted much of his energy to promoting inter-faith harmony in the UK and abroad. 

He is known to feel deeply ‘troubled’ about recent unrest involving the Hindu and Muslim communities in Leicester. 

Earlier this week he held a reception for members of the British South Asian Community in Edinburgh to recognise their contribution to Britain and invited community leaders and two senior police officers from the region. 

While there are no firm plans for the King to visit Leicester yet, temporary Chief Constable Rob Nixon said he was ‘hopeful’ one would be organised soon. 

A senior royal aide said Charles was keen to continue to take an active role maintaining community cohesion.

‘The King did request that police and community groups from Leicester [were invited] as he was concerned to hear about the recent tensions and conflict. 

‘He hopes to build and promote interfaith and community dialogue and support,’ they said. 

Among those who spoke to the King this week were representatives from the Federation of Muslim Organisations, the Hindu community, the Daman and the Diu communities in Leicester. 

Mr Nixon said: ‘He was obviously appreciative of what our role has been in terms of policing, and he was very, very interested in hearing the community voice.’ 

East Leicester Neighbourhood Policing Commander Inspector Yakub Ismail added that Charles ‘recognised the impact on the community and we are in a strong place and coming out of this’. 

Violence broke out in the city after an Asian Cup cricket match between Pakistan and India in Dubai on August 28. 

He said: ‘Coronations come once in a generation. If this is seen as a cut-price Coronation it will backfire.

‘This is a chance to represent the people and the nation on a global stage. It would be very sad if that was wasted.’

The King is expected to be crowned at Westminster Abbey in June next year, although no date has been officially announced.

Royal watchers had hoped for a day of pageantry to rival the Queen’s Coronation in 1953, which was watched by millions in Britain and around the world.

But King Charles is said to favour a shorter ceremony to reflect his wish for a slimmed-down, modern monarchy, while retaining some of the drama and dignity that accompanied the Queen’s funeral.

Blueprints for the Coronation include drastic cuts to the length of the ceremony, from more than three hours to just over an hour.

The guest list would also be slashed from 8,000 dignitaries who attended the Queen’s Coronation to 2,000. Ceremonial robes could also be ditched for formal suits.

In 1953, some 8,000 guests crammed into Westminster Abbey for the three-hour ceremony which was televised for the first time.

Millions watched the arcane rituals and ancient traditions. But some are expected to be scrapped in next year’s Coronation, including presenting the monarch with gold ingots, and a lengthy process known as the Court of Claims which allocated ceremonial roles to members of the gentry. Palace and government officials have been working on plans known as Operation Golden Orb, masterminded by the Duke of Norfolk.

The Duke, who played a key role in organising the Queen’s funeral, has been tasked with preparing a shorter, simpler and more diverse Coronation ceremony, according to The Mail on Sunday.

A source told the newspaper: ‘The King has stripped back a lot of the Coronation in recognition that the world has changed in the past 70 years.’ 

Prince William is also expected to play an important role in planning the ceremony.

Lieutenant Colonel Anthony Mather started the plan for the King’s Coronation, although it has since been updated.

He said: ‘No Coronation robes. Give them to a museum where they belong. 

‘It’s not going to be a tweed jacket and pair of jeans – but morning suit or lounge suit.’

He added: ‘There are about 700 peers, well they won’t all be there. The same with MPs: they won’t all be present because he’s not being crowned for them. He’s being crowned for the people.’

Velvet chairs made for the 1953 Coronation are likely to be replaced by standard seating. 

The traditional presentation of gold to the monarch is also likely to disappear. 

King Charles is said to favour a shorter ceremony to reflect his wish for a slimmed-down, modern monarchy

King Charles is said to favour a shorter ceremony to reflect his wish for a slimmed-down, modern monarchy

Discussions have been held about a more relaxed dress code, with peers possibly allowed to wear lounge suits instead of ceremonial robes. (Pictured: the British Gold State Coach)

Discussions have been held about a more relaxed dress code, with peers possibly allowed to wear lounge suits instead of ceremonial robes. (Pictured: the British Gold State Coach)

Among those set to miss out will be MPs and peers who are likely to be told that they cannot be guaranteed a place. (Pictured: From left to right, Camilla, Queen Consort, King Charles III, Prince William and Kate Middleton)

Among those set to miss out will be MPs and peers who are likely to be told that they cannot be guaranteed a place. (Pictured: From left to right, Camilla, Queen Consort, King Charles III, Prince William and Kate Middleton)

An ‘ingot or wedge of gold of a pound weight’ was presented by the Lord Great Chamberlain before being placed on the altar.

A source said: ‘In an age where people are feeling the pinch, this is not going to happen.’

Some key rituals will be retained, including the anointing of the monarch, who will swear to be the ‘defender of the faith’, not ‘defender of faith’ as previously speculated.

The 1762 Gold State Coach will also be part of the procession.

The ceremony is expected to be more religiously and culturally diverse, and arcane language adapted for a modern audience.

Mr Roberts said: ‘Coronations are moments of national celebration. 

‘Nobody wants to waste money, but Britain can only exert its soft power effectively if occasions like this are done well.

‘A great pageant like a coronation is a chance to draw the attention of the world to Britain. It could advertise Britain wonderfully.’

But Ingrid Seward, author of Prince Philip Revealed, said the day would still provide some pageantry. 

She said: ‘It will be different to the Queen’s Coronation. She was 26, young and beautiful and it was a very different time.

‘I think King Charles has read the public mood very well. Times have changed. We are in the middle of a war in Ukraine, and a crisis at home. 

‘We do still need joyous moments, and I still think this Coronation will be just as wonderful, but it will fit our times.’ Buckingham Palace declined to comment.

Pull out all the stops, King Charles, and give Britain a day to remember, writes DANIEL JOHNSON 

King Charles’s reported plans for a slimmed down Coronation next year are in keeping with his vision of a modernised monarchy.

But would it really be wise to have the Coronation shortened from three hours to one, the guest list cut by three-quarters and a less formal dress code?

The King will still be anointed by the Archbishop of Canterbury, but the accompanying rituals will be reduced and the language will be ‘adapted so as to be understandable to a modern audience’.

Rewriting such an archaic ceremony, which is older than Westminster Abbey itself, is a perilous undertaking. While the liturgy used to crown the monarch has evolved over the centuries, it remains a religious service and every part of it has a significance that is not merely secular, but sacred.

King Charles¿s reported plans for a slimmed down Coronation next year are in keeping with his vision of a modernised monarchy

King Charles’s reported plans for a slimmed down Coronation next year are in keeping with his vision of a modernised monarchy

The origins of the English monarchy are obscured by the mists of time. It is the Coronation that connects us to the very beginning of our existence as a nation state.

Handel’s anthem Zadok The Priest, composed for George II’s Coronation in 1727 and sung at crownings ever since, is a reminder of the thread of history stitched into this extraordinary ceremony.

The words, taken from the Biblical passage describing the anointing of King Solomon, have been used at every Coronation since the Anglo-Saxon King Edgar was crowned in Bath in 973: ‘And all the people rejoiced and said, God save the King! Long live the King! God save the King! May the King live for ever. Amen. Hallelujah.’

The plans appear to have been made in view of the cost of living crunch millions are facing.

Yet I am not at all sure that a cut-down, updated version is what the country actually wants.

Perhaps the King and his advisers should reflect on the lessons to be learned from the solemn, moving yet magnificent spectacle that we witnessed only last month.

There was nothing ‘slimmed down’ about the Queen’s funeral. You can’t really do these things by halves.

It was, quite rightly, judged by the world to have been a fitting farewell to a universally admired monarch. The nation was thrilled by a breathtaking display, laid on to express our love and gratitude to our beloved Sovereign – gratitude that she had earned by a lifetime of devoted service.

If ever there was a time and a place for pomp, this was it. For ten days, we marvelled at a sequence of splendid ceremonies, beginning in Scotland followed by the lying-in-state and culminating in the obsequies at Westminster Abbey and St George’s Chapel. The day of the funeral was full of moments that will live in our memories for ever.

Who could forget the pallbearers, as they carried the mortal remains of their Commander-in-Chief out of Westminster Hall, to be greeted by the King, his family and the gun carriage drawn by naval ratings?

The King will still be anointed by the Archbishop of Canterbury, but the accompanying rituals will be reduced and the language will be ¿adapted so as to be understandable to a modern audience¿

The King will still be anointed by the Archbishop of Canterbury, but the accompanying rituals will be reduced and the language will be ‘adapted so as to be understandable to a modern audience’

None of the grandeur, flawlessly executed by many thousands of people, happened by accident. It had been carefully planned and rehearsed for years.

The late Queen herself was intimately involved. It was her decision to hold the funeral in Westminster Abbey rather than St George’s Chapel in Windsor, so that as many people as possible could attend.

This was a break with precedent: no royal funeral had taken place at the Abbey since the 18th century. No doubt some officials disapproved, tut-tutting about the cost or fretting about security.

Yet it was unquestionably the right decision. With her unerring instinct for the public mood, Her Majesty knew what the nation, Commonwealth and the world expected.

And she was as aware as anyone that the monarchy brings in so much more than it costs in terms of soft power, prestige and tourism.

So it should be with the Coronation of King Charles. I am glad he has let it be known that he will be crowned as defender of the faith, not defender of faith.

It is a Christian ceremony and must reflect the liturgy and beliefs of the Church of England, of which the King is the Supreme Governor. I am glad that we have a Church established by law in this realm, even though I myself, as a Roman Catholic, do not belong to it.

The leaders of other faiths recognise their freedoms and rights are better protected in this Christian country than in an atheist one.

The great and much lamented former Chief Rabbi, Jonathan Sacks, told me he was grateful to live in a land where the Anglican faith was primus inter pares (first among equals). He feared a militantly secular Britain would be less tolerant and Jews in particular might feel less at home here.

It is understandable that the King wants his Coronation to reflect the more diverse country we have become in the past 70 years.

But he should beware of ‘woke’ attempts to change the ceremony to accommodate those of all faiths and none. There’s a danger that Charles risks making himself somehow less authoritative if he’s not going to be presented to the world as a full-on monarch.

To think otherwise is just self-defeating virtue-signalling.

Similarly, Charles should not worry too much about the cost, at a time of concern about rising inflation, taxes and mortgages.

That cost is a drop in the ocean of public spending. Those involved in the ceremonials will count it an honour and most of it won’t cost the taxpayer a penny. This is the ultimate public occasion. It has nothing to do with private extravagance by a few royals, some of whom may be open to criticism.

Only a rump of embittered anti-monarchists will begrudge us the pomp and circumstance the British do better than anyone else on Earth. So my message to His Majesty is: pull out all the stops, Sir.

Let the nation enjoy a day of joyful celebration at the crowning of our new King.

 

The secrets of King Charles III’s slimmed down coronation REVEALED: Ceremony will last little over an hour – instead of usual FOUR – while ancient rituals are axed and guest list is slashed by 6,000 – but iconic Gold State Coach WILL feature in procession

By Kate Mansey and Charlotte Griffiths for Mail on Sunday

King Charles’s cut-down Coronation is set to last little more than an hour, The Mail on Sunday can reveal. The service at Westminster Abbey next year will have fewer arcane rituals and be significantly shorter than the 1953 ceremony when Queen Elizabeth was crowned.

King Charles is understood to want his Coronation to set the tone for a streamlined and modern monarchy, while retaining some of the pomp and majesty that stunned the world during the Queen’s lying-in-state and funeral ceremonies.

The MoS can reveal that under a blueprint known as Operation Golden Orb:

  • The Coronation ceremony is set to be dramatically cut in length from more than three hours to just over an hour;
  • The guest list for the ceremony is likely to be slashed from 8,000 to 2,000, with hundreds of nobles and parliamentarians missing out;
  • Discussions have been held about a more relaxed dress code, with peers possibly allowed to wear lounge suits instead of ceremonial robes;
  • Ancient and time-consuming rituals – including presenting the monarch with gold ingots – will be axed to save time;
  • Prince William is likely to play an important role in helping to plan the ceremony.
King Charles is understood to want his Coronation to set the tone for a streamlined and modern monarchy, while retaining some of the pomp and majesty that stunned the world during the Queen¿s lying-in-state and funeral ceremonies

The guest list for the ceremony is likely to be slashed from 8,000 to 2,000, with hundreds of nobles and parliamentarians missing out

King Charles is understood to want his Coronation to set the tone for a streamlined and modern monarchy, while retaining some of the pomp and majesty that stunned the world during the Queen’s lying-in-state and funeral ceremonies. (Pictured: left, Camilla and King Charles III in the House of Lords, while on the right, the late Queen and Prince Philip in 2014 attending the state opening of Parliament in the Upper Chamber) 

It will be more religiously and culturally diverse. While the 1953 Coronation required the Queen to make various outfit changes, a source said: ¿King Charles is unlikely to do the same and the language will be adapted so as to be understandable to a more modern audience.' (Pictured: Queen Elizabeth II riding in the Gold State coach from Buckingham Palace to St Paul's Cathedral)

 It will be more religiously and culturally diverse. While the 1953 Coronation required the Queen to make various outfit changes, a source said: ‘King Charles is unlikely to do the same and the language will be adapted so as to be understandable to a more modern audience.’ (Pictured: Queen Elizabeth II riding in the Gold State coach from Buckingham Palace to St Paul’s Cathedral)

Queen Elizabeth II on her coronation on 2nd June 1953. King Charles's coronation ceremony is set to be dramatically shorter in length than Her Majesty's was. The Queen¿s Coronation was based largely on that of her father, King George VI, in 1937, which in turn was modelled on that of King George V in 1911. (Pictured: Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II posed for this picture made by Cecil Beaton in the Throne Room at Buckingham Palace, London, after her Coronation, June 2nd 1953)

Queen Elizabeth II on her coronation on 2nd June 1953. King Charles’s coronation ceremony is set to be dramatically shorter in length than Her Majesty’s was. The Queen’s Coronation was based largely on that of her father, King George VI, in 1937, which in turn was modelled on that of King George V in 1911. (Pictured: Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II posed for this picture made by Cecil Beaton in the Throne Room at Buckingham Palace, London, after her Coronation, June 2nd 1953)

The Queen’s Coronation was based largely on that of her father, King George VI, in 1937, which in turn was modelled on that of King George V in 1911.

But Palace insiders say the Duke of Norfolk, who as Earl Marshal is masterminding the Coronation, has been tasked with preparing a simpler, shorter and more diverse ceremony that reflects modern Britain.

‘The King has stripped back a lot of the Coronation in recognition that the world has changed in the past 70 years,’ one well-placed source said last night.

In 1953, some 8,000 peers and commoners spent more than three hours crammed into the Abbey on makeshift benches and improvised gantries. In contrast, Charles’s Coronation is expected to last little more than an hour, with only 2,000 guests and dignitaries.

Among those set to miss out will be MPs and peers who are likely to be told that they cannot be guaranteed a place.

It will be more religiously and culturally diverse. While the 1953 Coronation required the Queen to make various outfit changes, a source said: ‘King Charles is unlikely to do the same and the language will be adapted so as to be understandable to a more modern audience.’

Her Majesty The Queen's Coronation was watched by more than 20million people across the world

The written oath that she signed on that momentous day has rarely been seen - until now. The incredible document (above) is among a trove of material that has been digitised by the National Archives to mark the Queen's Platinum Jubilee

Her Majesty The Queen’s Coronation was watched by more than 20million people across the world. But the written oath that she signed on that momentous day has rarely been seen – until now. The incredible document (right) is among a trove of material that has been digitised by the National Archives to mark the Queen’s Platinum Jubilee

Her Majesty vowed as head of the Church of England to maintain the 'Laws of God' and also to maintain the 'Protestant Reformed Religion established by law'. Above: The Queen is crowned by the Archbishop of Canterbury Geoffrey Fisher

Her Majesty vowed as head of the Church of England to maintain the ‘Laws of God’ and also to maintain the ‘Protestant Reformed Religion established by law’. Above: The Queen is crowned by the Archbishop of Canterbury Geoffrey Fisher

The Queen's written vow was required the Coronation Oath Act of 1689. The legislation ensures that the monarch promises to maintain the established Protestant Church. Above: The Queen at her Coronation

The Queen’s written vow was required the Coronation Oath Act of 1689. The legislation ensures that the monarch promises to maintain the established Protestant Church. Above: The Queen at her Coronation

Some key rituals will be retained, including the anointing of the monarch, who will swear to be the ‘defender of the faith’, not ‘defender of faith’ as previously speculated. The 1762 Gold State Coach, which was refurbished at great expense for the Queen’s Platinum Jubilee, will also once again be part of the Coronation procession.

Other lengthy traditions are likely to be axed. In the final weeks of 1952, the ancient Court of Claims was set up in Westminster to assess which members of the gentry had the right to perform certain roles.

Over a period of several weeks the court, led by senior judges in England and Scotland, heard 21 claims.

The Earl of Shrewsbury was appointed to carry a white wand as a symbol of his office, while the Dean of Westminster was allowed to instruct the Queen in the rites and ceremonies. Winston Churchill, then Prime Minister and Lord Warden of the Cinque Ports, a ceremonial position dating back to the 12th Century, presented claims from various barons of the ports to carry the canopy over the head of the Queen.

The MoS understands that the Court of Claims is set to be scrapped in the run-up to the ceremony, likely to be in the summer.

Pictured: The Queen is seen on the day of her Coronation with her husband Prince Philip in the Gold State Coach, which dates back to the 18th century

Pictured: The Queen is seen on the day of her Coronation with her husband Prince Philip in the Gold State Coach, which dates back to the 18th century

One of the BBC’s cameras is seen during the Queen’s Coronation in 1953, at the moment that the Gold State Coach rolled past

The BBC's coverage was fronted by veteran broadcaster Richard Dimbleby (pictured) over the course of seven hours

The BBC’s coverage was fronted by veteran broadcaster Richard Dimbleby (pictured) over the course of seven hours

The last photo taken of Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II - two days before she died - when she met Liz Truss and asked her to form a government

The last photo taken of Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II – two days before she died – when she met Liz Truss and asked her to form a government

The traditional presentation of gold to the monarch is also likely to disappear. In 1952, it was reported that ‘an ingot or wedge of gold of a pound weight’ was presented to the monarch by the Lord Great Chamberlain before being placed upon the altar. A source said: ‘In an age where people are feeling the pinch, this is not going to happen.’

Velvet chairs made especially for the 1953 Coronation are likely to be replaced by standard seating.

Diplomats and other male guests invited to the 1953 Coronation were instructed that ‘knee breeches’ were in order, while women were advised to wear headgear, preferably tiaras.

The dress code next year will be less prescriptive.

Discussions had taken place on relaxing the requirement for peers to wear so-called coronation robes. A cloak of crimson velvet, the rank of the peer is indicated by rows of ermine – a stoat’s white winter fur and black tail end – on the cape. Lieutenant Colonel Anthony Mather, who started the plan for King Charles’s Coronation – which has since been updated – told The Mail on Sunday: ‘No Coronation robes. Give them to a museum where they belong. It’s not going to be a tweed jacket and pair of jeans – but morning suit or lounge suit.’

Other experts speculated that peers could don their ermine-trimmed parliamentary robes instead.

Outlining how the guest list will be reduced, Lt Col Mather added: ‘‘There are about 700 peers, well they won’t all be there,’ he said. ‘The same with MPs: they won’t all be present because he’s not being crowned for them. He’s being crowned for the people.’

Seventy years ago, Prince Philip was instrumental in chairing the Privy Council Coronation Committee that oversaw many of the ceremonial arrangements for the big day.

A great moderniser, he agreed that the service should be televised. This time, as heir to the throne, Prince William is expected to play an important role on the committee.

Meanwhile, as The Mail on Sunday revealed in February, Camilla will be crowned Queen Consort alongside her husband.

The Duke of Norfolk declined to comment.

Meet the Queen Consort: Royal Family shares series of photos highlighting the life and work of Camilla – from her love of rescue dogs to her charity involvement, and her endorsement from the Queen

By Vanessa Allen and Rebecca English Royal Editor for the Daily Mail 

The slideshow on the Royal Family Instagram account showcases the role of the Queen Consort and what it involves

The slideshow on the Royal Family Instagram account showcases the role of the Queen Consort and what it involves

The Royal Family Instagram account has shared a series of photographs of the Queen Consort, painting a portrait of her life.

A slideshow of 17 images shared via Stories, titled The Queen Consort, gives a snapshot of the royal’s personal and working life.

Compiled a month after her husband became king, and she undertook her new title within the Firm, the slideshow opens with a photo of the royal overlaid with the words ‘the Queen Consort’.

The second slide, a photo of Camilla with Charles, outlines her role, saying: ‘The Queen Consort supports her husband, the King, in carrying out his works and duties as Sovereign.

‘Her Majesty also undertakes public engagements on behalf of the charities that she supports.’ 

The slideshow then shares some biographical details, starting with her birth in 1947 in London, highlighting her 2005 wedding to King Charles, and their 15th wedding anniversary in 2020. 

The Queen Consort and King Charles pose with their two adopted Jack Russell terriers from Battersea Dogs and Cats Home

The Queen Consort and King Charles pose with their two adopted Jack Russell terriers from Battersea Dogs and Cats Home

One of the snaps showed Camilla with her mother-in-law the Queen, accompanying the photo with a quote from the late monarch highlighting her wish that Camilla be known as Queen Consort

One of the snaps showed Camilla with her mother-in-law the Queen, accompanying the photo with a quote from the late monarch highlighting her wish that Camilla be known as Queen Consort

Rounding up some of her charity work, the slideshow notes that when Camilla was Duchess of Cornwall, she became patron of more than 100 charities, among them organisations promoting animal welfare, and helping survivors of domestic violence.

Viewers learn that the Queen Consort’s first patronage was the Royal Osteoporosis Society (ROS). 

A slide reads: ‘The Queen Consort’s involvement in this charity began in 1994 after seeing her own mother and grandmother suffering with the disease.’   

The video then highlights Camilla’s love of reading, and highlights a quote from her on World Book Day 2020.

She says: ‘If I can give one piece of advice, it is to put down your phones and pick up a book, especially before bed time. 

Wedding: King Charles married the Queen Consort in 2005, the couple celebrated their 15th wedding anniversary in 2020

Wedding: King Charles married the Queen Consort in 2005, the couple celebrated their 15th wedding anniversary in 2020

As well as supporting the King, the Queen Consort is involved with more than 100 charities, advocating for a range of causes including the arts and health

As well as supporting the King, the Queen Consort is involved with more than 100 charities, advocating for a range of causes including the arts and health

The Queen Consort is a passionate supporter of the Royal Osteoporosis Society after her mother and grandmother suffered from the disease

The Queen Consort is a passionate supporter of the Royal Osteoporosis Society after her mother and grandmother suffered from the disease 

Camilla also believes in the value of reading, urging people to put down their phones and take up a book

Camilla also believes in the value of reading, urging people to put down their phones and take up a book 

Camilla says reading books will help immerse you in a thousand different worlds one page at a time

Camilla says reading books will help immerse you in a thousand different worlds one page at a time 

‘Books never lose their signal or run out of battery and they will always take you to a thousand different worlds with every turn of a page.’

The video then promotes Camilla’s work with domestic violence and sexual abuse survivors.

In a speech that appears in the video, Camilla says: ‘We do not in any way hold all men responsible for sexual violence. 

‘But we do need them all aboard to tackle it.’

She adds: ‘After all, rapists are not born, they’re constructed.

‘And it takes an entire community, male and female, to dismantle the lies, words and actions that foster a culture in which sexual assault is seen as normal and in which it shames the victim.’ 

Along with King Charles, Camilla is president of The Elephant Family charity, which was founded by her late brother

Along with King Charles, Camilla is president of The Elephant Family charity, which was founded by her late brother  

The Queen Consort is known to speak out on issues surrounding sexual violence against girls and women

The Queen Consort is known to speak out on issues surrounding sexual violence against girls and women 

In her role, Camilla also holds 13 military appointments, taking over some of the roles from the late Prince Philip

In her role, Camilla also holds 13 military appointments, taking over some of the roles from the late Prince Philip 

The video also makes reference to her work with The Elephant Family charity, which seeks to help Asian elephants, and was founded by her late brother Mark Shand. 

And it mentions her patronage of Battersea Dogs and Cats home in London, and the two Jack Russell terriers, Beth and Bluebell, who she adopted from there.

The video also highlights her 13 military appointments, including Colonel Chief of the Rifles, a position she took over from the late Prince Philip, her father-in-law. 

And it explores her commitment to helping older people keep active and feel less isolated. 

Lastly, there is an image of Camilla with the late Queen, accompanied by a quote from Her Majesty, voicing her support of the then Duchess of Cornwall.

It says: ‘It is my sincere wish that, when the time comes, Camilla will be known as Queen Consort as she continues her own loyal service.’

Netflix sparks fury with plans to show Prince Philip ‘pursuing an affair’ with close friend Penny Knatchbull in royal drama series The Crown just weeks after the Queen’s death – with story line branded ‘cruel rubbish’ by expert

By Matthew Lodge for MailOnline 

Netflix has sparked fury after it emerged it could show scenes depicting Prince Philip pursuing an affair with close friend Penny Knatchbull in the new series of The Crown.

The hit show, which is one of the streaming giant’s most popular programmes, is set to return to screens on November 9 with concern from some royal observers about this season’s content.

The Sun reports that among the story lines in the coming episodes will be ‘intimate scenes’ between the late Duke of Edinburgh and the Countess Mountbatten of Burma, who was 30 years his junior.

It is thought the pair will be seen touching hands as Philip talks about his marriage, in a move that has been branded ‘cruel rubbish’ by the late Queen’s former press secretary.

Dickie Arbiter, who was Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II’s spokesperson from 1988 to 2000, told the publication it was distasteful that such scenes would be played out only weeks after her funeral.

Prince Philip and Penny Knatchbull had a friendship lasting decades after they bonded over a love of carriage riding. Here they are pictured at the Windsor Horse Show in 2009

Prince Philip and Penny Knatchbull had a friendship lasting decades after they bonded over a love of carriage riding. Here they are pictured at the Windsor Horse Show in 2009

The new season of The Crown is set to show Philip pursuing an affair with Countess Mountbatten of Burma, it is being reported. Here the pair are pictured sitting in his car at the Royal Windsor Horse Show

The new season of The Crown is set to show Philip pursuing an affair with Countess Mountbatten of Burma, it is being reported. Here the pair are pictured sitting in his car at the Royal Windsor Horse Show

Coming just weeks after the nation laid Her Majesty to rest next to Prince Philip, this is very distasteful and, quite frankly, cruel rubbish,’ he said.

‘The truth is that Penny was a long-time friend of the whole family. Netflix are not interested in people’s feelings.’

Majesty magazine editor Ingrid Seward added: ‘It’s in exceedingly bad taste.

‘This is fiction. There’s no way in a million years he’d discuss his marriage with anybody. The royals probably won’t watch it for their own sanity 

A Netflix source told MailOnline that reports about the content of next season are ‘pure speculation’.

Buckingham Palace has been contacted for comment. 

Prince Philip is being portrayed by veteran actor Sir Jonathan Pryce (pictured) in the new season of The Crown

Prince Philip is being portrayed by veteran actor Sir Jonathan Pryce (pictured) in the new season of The Crown

Penny Knatchbull is being portrayed by British actress Natascha McElhone in what is slated to be the penultimate season of the Netflix show

Penny Knatchbull is being portrayed by British actress Natascha McElhone in what is slated to be the penultimate season of the Netflix show

Referred to as the ‘second-most imporant woman’ in his life, Philip bonded with Penny, who is now 69, over their mutual love of carriage riding and had a friendship lasting decades.

Philip is said to have supported Penny when her five-year-old daughter Leonora died of kidney cancer.

Also known as Lady Romsey and Lady Brabourne, Penny was a regular visitor at Wood Farm, the cottage on the edge of the Sandringham Estate in Norfolk where the Prince spent much of his time after retiring from public life in August 2017.

She was the only non-family member invited to his intimate 30-person funeral last year, reflecting just what an important role she held within the Duke’s life.

Indeed, the Countess enjoyed such a close bond with the Queen and Philip that Palace staff reportedly nicknamed her ‘and also’, because no guest list was considered complete without her.

The Duke of Edinburgh was said to have provided support for the Countess after her five-year-old daughter died of kidney cancer. Here the pair are pictured walking together with her husband Lord Brabourne in the background

The Duke of Edinburgh was said to have provided support for the Countess after her five-year-old daughter died of kidney cancer. Here the pair are pictured walking together with her husband Lord Brabourne in the background

Penelope Knatchbull, Countess Mountbatten of Burma was the only non-royal invited to Prince Philip's funeral. Here she is pictured at the Service of Thanksgiving for him in March this year

Penelope Knatchbull, Countess Mountbatten of Burma was the only non-royal invited to Prince Philip’s funeral. Here she is pictured at the Service of Thanksgiving for him in March this year

The Duke of Edinburgh's carriage-driving companion - one of his closest confidantes - Countess Mountbatten of Burma (pictured together in 1975)

The Duke of Edinburgh’s carriage-driving companion – one of his closest confidantes – Countess Mountbatten of Burma (pictured together in 1975) 

She also attended the Queen’s funeral last month, another sign of her close ties to the Royal Family.

Penny is set to be portrayed by British actress Natascha McElhone in what will be the penultimate season of The Crown.

Many of her scenes will be opposite Sir Jonathan Pryce, who is stepping into the shoes of Tobias Menzies and Matt Smith to play Prince Philip.

The Sun reports that one episode of the upcoming season will see the Duke of Edinburgh teach Penny carriage-riding, while disclosing his marriage has its ‘problems’.

Joining the cast for the show’s fifth season is Imelda Staunton, who will be portraying Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II, while Dominic West will play Prince Charles and Elizabeth Debicki will protray Diana, Princess of Wales.



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